We still can’t believe this ever happened. Demi Lovato terrified her family, friends, and fans when she suffered a near-fatal overdose in July. But the “Sober” singer is determined to show her loved ones that she isn’t taking this second chance at life for granted. “Demi knows she’s lucky to be alive,” a source assured Life & Style. “She isn’t taking rehab lightly at all.”

Besides checking into an undisclosed rehab facility, the pop star sought additional treatment in Chicago, where she reportedly met with a psychiatrist who specializes in mental health and sobriety several times this summer. “Demi’s cutting out all the negativity from her life,” added the source. “She’s even put the Hollywood Hills home where she overdosed up for sale because the thought of going back there sends shivers down her spine.”

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According to Brandon Johnson, a man who’s claimed he supplied the 26-year-old with drugs, the pair freebased oxycodone the night of her tragic overdose. “Demi still has a long way to go on her road to recovery, but she’s looking forward to this new chapter,” says the source. “Thanks to all the love and support she’s received, Demi no longer feels alone.”

Since her overdose, Demi has only given one public statement.  On Sunday, Aug. 5, she took to Instagram to give her fans some much-needed peace of mind. “I have always been transparent about my journey with addiction,” Demi wrote. “What I’ve learned is that this illness is not something that disappears or fades with time. It is something I must continue to overcome and have not done yet.”

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She continued, “I want to thank God for keeping me alive and well. To my fans, I am forever grateful for all of your love and support throughout this past week and beyond. Your positive thoughts and prayers have helped me navigate through this difficult time.” 

And lastly, “I want to thank my family, my team, and the staff at Cedars-Sinai who have been by my side this entire time. Without them, I wouldn’t be here writing this letter to all of you. I now need time to heal and focus on my sobriety and road to recovery. The love you have all shown me will never be forgotten and I look forward to the day where I can say I came out on the other side. I will keep fighting.” We’re all rooting for you, Demi!

If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357).